Dale Tuggy

Dale Tuggy is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he teaches courses in analytic theology, philosophy of religion, religious studies, and the history of philosophy.

9 Comments

  1. Roman
    June 10, 2015 @ 10:30 am

    Doesn’t being a necessary being mean that the being cannot fail to exist? Just because once something exists it cannot cease to exist doesn’t mean that it cannot fail to exist. It could not simply, not exist and never have existed in the first Place. Wouldn’t being a necessary being mean that the statement “this necessary being does not exist,” contains a logical contradiction?

    • Joshua Harris
      June 10, 2015 @ 11:38 am

      Right, I agree with this and would be very interested to hear Prof. Tuggy’s response.

      • Dale Tuggy
        June 10, 2015 @ 4:23 pm

        Excellent point, gents. Yes, I think this is right. I slipped into arguing that God’s existence is not strictly metaphysically necessary, but rather “necessary” in the sense of inevitable or now-unchangeable, such that it in principle it’s too late to prevent it. My argument only shows that God can’t cease to exist. But that’s not enough.

        I have a few notions about how to proceed… but let me mull over them first. Stay tuned. In the mean time, I must say:
        https://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/wellplayedwellplayed_d41ebe3c5301f6d62668a863aad4ebf5.png

  2. Joshua Harris
    June 10, 2015 @ 12:20 am

    Thanks again for the ongoing discussion. Seems clear that your conclusion still doesn’t let you validly infer that God is a necessary being, right? For even if it were impossible that he should cease to exist, on this view it seems to be quite possible that he could come into being.

    • Dale Tuggy
      June 10, 2015 @ 4:25 pm

      I think that’s impossible too. What comes into being is caused to come into being. But God is by def a se. So he can’t be caused to come into being, so he can’t come into being.

      Still, this would only show that given that God exists now, he’s always existed, and always will. But this pertains, for all I’ve shown, only to “worlds” in which
      God exists at some time. But what must be show is that God doesn’t fail to exist in any possible world…

      • Joshua Harris
        June 10, 2015 @ 4:36 pm

        Right, makes sense. Thanks for engaging.

  3. Pär Stenberg
    June 9, 2015 @ 4:13 pm

    tl;dr

    • Dale Tuggy
      June 10, 2015 @ 4:23 pm

      Oh give me a break. I know that you read church fathers. Some of those guys are first class wind-bags. 🙂

      • Pär Stenberg
        June 10, 2015 @ 5:27 pm

        Nah, I fake it all so as to appear intelligent and well-read. 🙂 I tl;dr:ed Irenaeus when he began comparing gnostic aeons to cucumbers and melons.