Dale Tuggy

Dale Tuggy is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he teaches courses in analytic theology, philosophy of religion, religious studies, and the history of philosophy.

4 Comments

  1. Benjamin Scott
    August 12, 2017 @ 12:40 am

    Stop talking about all this or I’ll tell the authorities! And the mob will cry out, “burn heretics, burn!” Don’t you know that only the powerful and coercive, elite Christian rulers and authorities have the natural ability to understand the words of the humble and meek Jesus? Whoever said that power corrupts must have been a weakling. Who ever said that the cross shows that the weakness of God is stronger than man’s power, was a fool. Whoever said that the greatest would be the servant of all was obviously mistaken, for that’s not how the world works, it’s not how the Church works, and that’s not how history works. It’s not how Christian society works. And Christian society is important! Are you trying to destroy the empire that history and bloodshed has built? Don’t you know that the Church is more important than any of its members. The Church must leave the 1 and stick with the 99 if it is to survive the gates of hell. The one must be sacrificed if necessary. It’s the safe and secure authority of the historic Church which tells us what to say about God. This alone excuses us from having to do the work of thinking about what it all might mean. Rest in ignorance, for in ignorance there is rest. Dissent means punishment.

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    • Mario Stratta
      August 12, 2017 @ 3:33 am

      Rest in ignorance, for in ignorance there is rest. Dissent means punishment.

      … Ignorance is Strength …
      … War is Peace …
      … Freedom is Slavery …

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  2. Paul Peterson
    August 10, 2017 @ 11:13 pm

    “For a great many people all the metaphysical fireworks pretty much boil down to this: sometimes they think that Jesus just is God himself, and sometimes they think God is someone and Jesus is someone else, that is, that they are two different beings.”

    Nailed it.

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  3. Mario Stratta
    August 10, 2017 @ 3:35 am

    The thing about Trinity theories is that no matter how elaborate  they become, people still pick up the Bible and end up thinking along unitarian lines.

    Of course, that entirely depends on what one means by “unitarian” and, as we all know by now, “unitarianism” is a rather broad concept, that embraces Socinus, at one extreme, and … Origen at the other.

    For a great many people all the metaphysical fireworks pretty much boil down to this: sometimes they think that Jesus just is God himself, and sometimes they think God is someone and Jesus is someone else, that is, that they are two different beings.

    Perhaps Paul has some responsibility in causing this confusion, when he says:

    But to us [there is but] one God, the Father, of whom [are] all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom [are] all things, and we by him. (1 For 8:6 – KJB)

    It’s an interesting question why this [that the homoousion of Nicea 325 became all-important] happened, but it’s a question that presses on everyone, not simply on the unitarian.

    Of course it was all-important! Here are two clues. The homoousion was the ONLY formula that the conciliar fathers could find that would obtain the wanted result, that is excluding the Arians from subscribing to the Creed decreed at Nicea. At least equally important is that the homoousion had been proposed personally by Emperor Constantine (probably based on his deed familiarity with Hermeticism)

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