Dale Tuggy

Dale Tuggy is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he teaches courses in analytic theology, philosophy of religion, religious studies, and the history of philosophy.

5 Comments

  1. Ben Nasmith
    November 30, 2016 @ 6:35 am

    I really enjoyed this interview, but I have been reading Paul Moser’s work for a couple years now so I’m already familiar with him. In a nutshell, Moser tries to account for the role of both the human and divine will in inquiry about God. He is very critical of approaches to theology or apologetics that treat God as just another object to examine rather than a supreme person/subject to be known, and by whom one may be known.

  2. Rivers
    November 29, 2016 @ 11:17 am

    Raymond,

    Don’t feel bad. I’m not a philosopher either, so this sounded like a lot of rambling to me too.

    • Raymond NAVARRO
      November 29, 2016 @ 5:01 pm

      I appreciate that Rivers.

      Dr. Moser spent most of his time warning would-be philosophers about avoiding the pitfalls of intellectualism, but he never discussed his overall perspective on the role or relationship between philosophy and Christianity simpliciter.

      • Rivers
        November 30, 2016 @ 8:06 am

        Raymond,

        Good point.

        I’m wary of the philosophical rambling and speculation because I don’t find Jesus and the apostles doing it when they were coming to terms with the implications of the gospel. I don’t think it needs to be so complicated.

  3. Raymond NAVARRO
    November 29, 2016 @ 8:01 am

    Its always interesting, when I have listened to someone speak, or have read some of their written material and I come away with a feeling of not really understanding what has just been communicated to me.- this appears to be one of those times.

    After listening to Dr. Moser speak for over 40 minutes, I still don’t have a clear understanding of what his position actually is – concerning the relationship between philosophy and Christianity.

    If philosophy is “dogged search for clarity”, then this might not have been achieved in this particular discussion.