Dale Tuggy

Dale Tuggy is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he teaches courses in analytic theology, philosophy of religion, religious studies, and the history of philosophy.

6 Comments

  1. Shea
    September 13, 2017 @ 11:57 pm

    So, isn’t it a bit petty to lambaste a book specifically written to partisan popular audience for failing to satisfy the demands of an analytic theologian? A more fair fight might be critiquing Fred Sander’s academic work on the Trinity, like his recent “The Triune God” (Zondervan, 2016).

    Reply

    • Dale
      September 14, 2017 @ 7:16 am

      Hi Shea. No, I don’t think so. If you listen to the review, you’ll find that I was not demanding some special “analytic” standards of it. I was judging it for what it is, on the basis of what it is trying to do. I have read The Triune God, but in part two of my review of The Deep Things of God, I’ve discussed what is in my view most interesting about it. Of course, your mileage may vary.

      Reply

  2. Sean Holbrook
    September 7, 2017 @ 8:16 pm

    Glad to see a new podcast, heard it today.

    Guess I shouldn’t be surprised to see Fred Sanders didn’t really try to take the task of proving the Trinity from the Bible. I’ve never really been impressed by anything I’ve read/heard from him. Albeit, it has been only a little[mainly his debate with Anthony Buzzard]. I don’t quite understand why he’s looked to as a formidable teacher/proponent of the Trinity still. This book only affirmed it based on your review. Seems like it was just a bunch of flip-flopping Trinity/trinity terms. Never have I seen/heard a single person actually show me any one text showing “God” defined as all 3 persons at once. That question is always avoided like the plague and given the general retort “The whole Bible teaches it… I don’t need one verse.” That seems like a bait and switch back to lowercase “trinity” to attempt to make the question seem foolish.

    Yet, as a former Trinitarian it took a lot to take a step back and say to myself when I became biblical unitarian… how did I not see that just because I can count three that doesn’t make them one God? It’s so clearly assumed by every Trinitarian.

    I know this was already a long review, but for future reviews could you involve more quotes from the books?

    Reply

    • Rivers
      September 12, 2017 @ 2:21 pm

      Sean,

      I agree. From all that I’ve heard from Sanders, it seems that he starts from a Trinitarian pardigmatic approach and doesn’t put much weight on exegesis of the biblical text. He’s almost like a Catholic priest who would start with official church doctrine and then work his way backward.

      It was difficult to get much out of the Buzzard-Sanders debate because the two men were approaching the doctrine with different methodologies.

      Reply

    • Rivers
      September 12, 2017 @ 2:22 pm

      Sean,

      I agree. From all that I’ve heard from Sanders, it seems that he starts with a Trinitarian pardigmatic approach and doesn’t put much weight on exegesis of the biblical text. He’s almost like a Catholic priest who would start with official church doctrine and then work his way backward.

      It was difficult to get much out of the Buzzard-Sanders debate because the two men were approaching the doctrine with different methodologies.

      Reply

    • Dale
      September 14, 2017 @ 7:21 am

      Thanks, Sean. Yes, I do like to provide quotes… although there is a conflict between covering a lot in a short time (which requires summarizing and paraphrasing) and giving a full taste of the book, which requires quotes. Not always easy to find that balance.

      Reply

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